A Fractions Number Line Project for Fourth Graders

March 28, 2015

A Fractions Book

I’ve finished up this fractions/number-line project that I’ve been thinking about. I worked with a class of fourth graders who were just starting their fractions unit. My plan from the start was to try to present a project that was dynamic enough to capture their interest. The center piece of the project was to make a “magic wallet,” which is a shortened variation of a Jacob’s Ladder. I’ve been using the name “Li’l Jacob” instead of “magic wallet” because, originally, I couldn’t remember the magic-wallet name, and Li’l Jacob seems properly descriptive.  This structure opens in two different ways, to reveal two different visuals. It’s tricky, and seems magical. I am happy to report that these students were over-the-moon happy to learn how make this.

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The students told me that the first step of arrangement of papers reminded them of a person

After showing the students what the finished book project would look like we dove right into making the L’il Jacobs. Making this requires a completely non-intuitive sequence of precise folding and gluing. The students have to keep track of where they are in the sequence in order to get the folding to work. I was nervous about how I could get them to see for themselves what was going on. A great surprise was that they offered me the best description I could hope for: they saw the arrangement of papers and immediately recognized it a human figure, legs and torso. Perfect! Now I was completely convinced that I would continue calling this a Little Jacob.

???????????????????????????????The students decided that this next step was best described by saying that they were covering Jacob’s innards.

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As the sequence of folding continues, the Jacob becomes smaller. (Notice the paper that student is using  to protect the desk from getting mucked up with glue.)

Jacob squared

Li”l Jacob squared

The last fold reduces the paper into a square.

Each student made four Li’l Jacobs. Each of these had a set of equivalent fractions written on and in it. But we didn’t even start with the fraction labeling until the third class. Our second class was about making the book that was going to hold our fraction cards.

We folded a 33″ x 4.5″ paper int halves, then quarters, then eighths, to make an eight page accordion. I know that most people don’t have access to paper this size, but with a some thought this can be created by combining smaller sheets of paper.

Pockets

Origami Pockets on every other page. Student chose their own colors.

 

Students then made origami pockets out of 5.5″ squares of paper. Starting with the second page, these were glued on to every other page of the book.

zero page

Creating a cover with a fold-in, to extend the number-line to inside

Next came the cover. The book needed an extension  so that the number line could start at zero. To accomplish this we attached an extra long cover piece then folded it over. I know I’ve explained that badly, so I hope the pictures above are adequate explanation.

fractions-Zero-to-OneFinally we were ready to label the Little Jacobs with equivalent fractions. I talked to students about how fractions could be a way of counting to one: one-fourth, two-fourths, three-fourths, four-fourths(one). I showed them my animated zero-to-one gif and some static images of equivalent fractions  but they seems to like the image above the best. We circled the columns of fractions equivalent to eighths. The really seemed to get the concept, and kept referring to it as they did their labeling.

four

The picture above is my sample that shows the labeling, with different ways to write equivalent fractions, as well as a simple addition problem, using the fractions.

labels

Here are some images of the students finished books.

https://bookzoompa.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/fractions-zero-to-one1.pdf

The even pages hold the fractions in the pockets.

odd pages

On the odd pages, students wrote out the fractions. These fractions had no equivalents on our chart. Forth graders don’t do fractions beyond the twelfths, so 1/8, 3/8. 5/8, and 7/8 stand alone.

K's book Some students were more inclined than other to do decorations on the books.

k2

One thing that was wonderful about this class was that the students were incredibly helpful to each other. I could have never gotten this far with this project if I had to problem shoot with each child individually. The students who grasped each step were enthusiastic about working with a classmate that didn’t quite get a step.

big line

 

We lined up the fractions so the eighths showed, thus showing the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 in the numerator. By the end of my third meeting with these students, just about everyone had finished with their books. This is one class that I can say is excited about equivalent fractions.

 

 

 

 

5 Responses to “A Fractions Number Line Project for Fourth Graders”

  1. ivasallay Says:

    Li’l Jacob might just help these kids love fractions!

    Like

  2. eliashickman Says:

    This was a fun but tedious activity. It took us around three hours. The Li’l Jacobs took quite a long time but were well worth it.
    http://imgur.com/0v8GMI3
    http://imgur.com/YXsnXmH

    Like


    • Sorry to hear it was tedious, but glad to hear it was fun and worth it. I can’t tell you how overwhelmed with pleasure that I was to get these photos from you! The one with the little books falling out, did that happen a lot? When I did these book with the students I ended up punching a little hole at the top of the last page, and threaded then looped a rubber band so that the book had a way of securing the Li”l jacabs in when the book was closed. I know exactly how much time it takes to gather the right materials and prep this project, and I really admire that you took on this challange. Those smiles are priceless.

      Like

  3. Kyly Sheldon Says:

    I totally needed you as a teacher when I was younger. I had such trouble understanding fractions back then. This project would have made it so clear and I would have LOVED making these books since I loved (and still do) making anything 🙂

    Like


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