Puffy Pentagon Box

March 31, 2016

 

Template for Puff Box

Template for Puff Box

I’m in the middle of a mind-numbing week of getting numbers together for taxes. I’m reaching for a little help from my friends to get through this week.

Pentagon Puff Boxes, front and back

Pentagon Puff Boxes, front and back

I saw these little pentagon puff boxes on Candy Wooding’s site. They looked simple enough, and she provided instructions and a template so of course I made one. It was simple to do, delightful, and just the sort of hands-on relief I needed from trudging through all my receipts. But then I got to thinking…uh, oh…

I wonder what the underlying structure looks like. Maybe I’d take a few minutes to work it out….

Backstage of the puffy box

Backstage of the puffy box

Turns out it wasn’t as easy as I thought. It took many false starts before I came up with this image, from which I could recreate my own template for the box.

Blank Puff Box

Blank Puff Box

I shouldn’t have taken the time to work on this today and yesterday, but, oh, well, it kept me more sane, and besides which it gave me just the excuse I needed to go looking for a great graphic to clip on to this shape. My first stop was, yet again, at Dan Anderson’s Open Processing site, where he just happened to have colorful squares rotating around a circle, which created pentagon shape.

All I can say is sometimes life is good.

Puff Boxes

Puff Boxes

So I made some puff boxes.

And played.

Puff Flower

Puff Flower

As far as I can tell, Candy Wooding created the design for these boxes, so I want to be sure to give her full credit for the design. There’s is a method to my madness here….I am thinking of putting together a paper crafts package as a partial fund-raiser for the local summer children’s program, and I want to include a few box designs. But that doesn’t preclude my offering them to you right now if you’d like to try your hand at these. Here’s my PDF of the Puff Boxes puff boxes .

Now, back to the other kind of paperwork. Sigh.

Addendum: Young Mr. Lawler provides a demonstration of how to make one of these boxes. Don’t be scared when the dog growls and the camera shakes https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=9GyvmsM9qL4

Have presents, need boxes

December 19, 2013

Boxes for presents

For me, making boxes feels similar to making books. I like the planning, the precision, and then the surprise of what it looks like when it comes together. And, since I seem to always have  odds and ends of beautiful papers around, making boxes for gifts is a satisfying way to deplete my stockpiles.

This year I combed through the web to find models of boxes that I hadn’t made before.  There seems to be no end to box-making tutorials. There were two styles of boxes that caught my eye. What was harder to find was templates and legible instructions for the ones that I picked out to make.

Boxes made from one sheet of paper

Boxes made from one sheet of paper

Here are the two styles of boxes that I am making this holiday season. The one on the left is an origami box, made from a square paper, no cutting or gluing.  I saw it on lovely website, http://www.duitang.com , which I encourage you to browse through. I copied the instructions from the pages, but the text was all but completely illegible. So I did a bit of cut and paste in Adobe Illustrator, replacing the text but keeping the drawings, and here’s what I came up with:

Gift Box designed independently by Tomoko Fuse in 1995

Gift Box designed independently by Tomoko Fuse in 1995

While searching out this structure I’ve inferred that both Robin Glynn and Tomoko Fuse figured out how to make this, independently of each other. It’s a tricky box to make, and if you haven’t done much origami, I don’t recommend trying this out unless you have a good bit of time on your hands. It’s worth taking a look at this YouTube box tutorial if these illustrated instructions don’t do it for you. Once I got the feel for the folds, it was nothing short of great fun to make.

box red box

This little rounded box originally hailed from a website that has deleted the page that originally posted the template that I looked at. Right now the only place I can find it is on pinterest boards, but these templates are so small that scaling them up creates ragged images. Needless to say I am delighted that I now know how to use my software to make usable templates. Here’s what I came up;

Box with buttonhole closure

Box with buttonhole closure

I debated whether or not to add any directions on to this page, as the image seems to completely suggest the steps to create the box.  I finally decided that words add a reassuring touch, so I wrote them in . I’d be interested in hearing from anyone who makes this to tell me  if they needed the words to accompany the template.

So, that’s it. Now it’s time to turn more of this…papers

…into these.

boxes and barn

Boxes on our snow covered picnic table, near the barn

If folding beautiful containers is appealing to you, here are some other posts which may offer some inspiration:

https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2012/11/21/three-years-and-a-day/

https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2009/12/29/festive-boxes/

https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2012/12/28/paper-to-go/

Happy Holidays!

ADDENDUM!!!!!  (March 1, 2014) I just saw a really lovely variation of the buttonhole closure box at Candy Wooding’s blog, My Paper Arts. She’s improvised on the rounded notches so that they show up as a heart.  Go to http://www.mypaperarts.com/2014/02/06/diy-crown-jewel-heart-box-template-included/ to see her photos of the box. She’s embedded this link http://www.mypaperarts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Crown-Jewel-heart-box.pdf in her post, which will bring up the template she’s created. Enjoy!

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