geometry and paper · holiday project · Ornament · Paper Ornament · Uncategorized

Round-up of Holiday Season Projects

A Bevy of Paper globes
A Bevy of Paper globes Directions at https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2017/11/24/spiraling-paper-ornament/

Making things out of paper seems to be something we do during the holiday season.

Here’s some projects that I’ve written about with links to the full posts that explain them, that seem appropriate for the season.

This first one, the Spiraling Ornaments was surprisingly well-liked. All year, when I visited different places, I’d see ones that people I know had made.

Video tutorial (not mine) for Kaleidocycle https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=tdv1GwY025M

 

 

Here’s a template for a kaleidocycle. Not particularly holiday-ish, but fun and colorful, folds into something like the image below. More about this at https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/kaleidocycles-and-tetrahedrons/

Kaleidocycle/tetrahedrons
Kaleidocycle/tetrahedrons

 

Next, directions for a six-sided snowflake. My big tip is to use paper napkins, as they already are the right shape: no extra prep needed! Also, paper napkins cut quite easily. They are perfect for snowflakes.

how to make a paper snowflake
https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2010/12/14/tis-the-season-to-make-paper-snowflakes/

 

If you want to understand how the cuts of your snowflakes affect the final design, see below:

 

https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/paper-snowflake-cutting-tips/

 

 

Festive Jumping Jacks are quite fun. I’ve made these with kids just a few times, as all the knot tying makes this an intense project for anything more than a small group, but so worth the effort!

Jumping Jumping Jack

To work out how to make these you might have to look at a few posts, which are all listed at https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/wat-meer-trekpoppen-more-jumping-jacks/

The stars below are tricky to make, until you get the hang of them. I still have the ones I made on display from last year.

https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2017/11/09/pentagons-paper-folding-stars-origami/

The original post contains a good bit of discussion about the geometry embedded in these shapes.

Finally, making little books with stories or messages is always worth doing.

Origami books made from a multiple folded papers, to create a Star Book and a Cascading Book, aka Origami Caterpillar Book
Origami books made from a multiple folded papers, to create a Star Book and a Cascading Book, aka Origami Caterpillar Book

Here’s a post that can get you started on some simple books to make with kids https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2017/10/10/four-books-students-can-figure-out-how-to-make-on-their-own/

For more an overwhelming amount of other book ideas, check out what I’ve tagged as making books with children

There you have it. Enough to do to keep you out of trouble at least until January.

Geometric Drawings · geometry and paper · geometry and paperfolding · origami

Pentagons, Paper Folding, Stars & Origami

I came across a lovely way of folding stars. It was in a youtube video by someone named Tobias.

As lovely as these stars are, what really caught my attention was the way Tobias showed how to use paper folding to make a pentagon from a square. This square-to-pentagon transformation was in a separate video, and since it will take me about two days to forget everything I saw in the video I drew out the directions.

How to fold a Pentagon from a Square
How to fold a Pentagon from a Square. For the Video of this that Tobias made, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kJmJUQVbO0

 

After the novelty (but not the thrill) wore off of making a pentagon from a square I began to look at the angles that I was making and figured that I could make the star with less steps (and perhaps with more accuracy) if I just started out with the net of the shape, so I made this map of the paper star’s fold lines:

Lines for a Folded Paper Star
Lines for a Folded Paper Star

If you make Tobias’s stars, after you get the hang of which lines fold in which direction, I highly recommend printing out lines above, score the lines with an inkless ink pen, and make that same star using just its essential folds.

The back of the paper sta
The back of the paper star

The photo above shows the backside of these stars. Quite a nice backside!

I’m sure that there are all sorts of things to do with pentagons, but something I want to mention is something that is fast and impressive, sort of the pentagon version of snowflake cuts. If you cut off an angled slice at the bottom of the folded up pentagon (step 12 in my tutorial drawing) there are all sorts of star possibilities.

36-54-90 triangles, with cutting lines on their tips
36-54-90 triangles, with cutting lines on their tips

These little beauties turn into:

Stars in Pentagons
Stars in Pentagons

The stars inscribed into these pentagons were made by cutting through all layers on the tips of the folded shapes.

 

And look, below there’s something extra for my friends who teach Geometry, and who might like a holiday themed angle activity. Part of the working out the folding pattern for the star was deciphering certain angles.

Find the Angles with degrees of 90, 45, and ~72, 18, 36, 54, and 108
Find the Angles with degrees of 90, 45, and ~72, 18, 23, 36, 54, 63 and 108

I had a good bit of help with the especially tricky parts of understanding the angle relationships. I’m sharing two twitter threads here, just because it was such a pleasure to get help from my friends.

and

That’s about it for now. Oh, and if you need to directions on how to fold a square from a rectangle, take a look at https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/paper-folding-squares-and-equilateral-triangles/


addendum March 2018

Here’s someone making this star. She makes it looks so easy! https://www.instagram.com/p/BfuSgYdnmY5/

Box

Origami Lantern

wp-1482275140973.jpgI came across a video tutorial for this lantern, made it, posted it on my Twitter account, @PaulaKrieg, and folks there showed such interest in it that I thought it would be good to post here as well.

wp-1482275721879.jpg

 

There’s a great video tutorial for making these at this link:  SonobeCubeLamp

I made some of these as gifts.

Before closing them up I put a tea light turns on for 6 hours and off for 18 hours. I turned on the tea light at around 4pm, then sealed them into the lamp and sent them off.

It will take about 2 months for the battery to finally turn off for good: tea lights with timer, from amazon.com

If you try making this lamp, here’s a tip for assembling the modular origami units: think of the pieces joining together by creating tension, in other words, notice how when one corner slips under a joining unit then the other corner goes over an opposing joining unit.

Lots of folding here, but so worth it.