Arts in Education · Math and Book Arts · Math and Paper Folding · Math with Art Supplies

Peek-a-Boo Skip Counting for First-Graders

Peek-a-boo skip counting
What number is under the heart?

For weeks I’ve been burning through piles of papers and ideas trying to work out an engaging skip-counting project to make as part of a math-activities folder for first graders. Having just done a math activities folder with kindergarteners, which went really well, I’ve been wanting to do something similar for first graders. As I’ve also been doing math-with-art-supplies bookmaking projects with second graders, I’ve been keen to design something for the next grade up.

What I’ve  needed to get me going on this is a school to want me to create a project for them. A couple of weeks ago, late in the season, a school called me, asked if I had any time for them, and we struck a deal. We’re doing the project that I’ve been wanting to create.

There will be four hands-on projects in a folder that the students will be making. This post is about just one of the projects, one that supports skip counting, reasoning, and attention to numerical patterns.

Show me what under the butterfly, Oh, it's a 14.
Show me what’s under the butterfly, Oh, it’s a 14. Still not sure what’s under the heart.

Skip counting is a big deal in first grade. Not only does it set the stage to understand multiplication, it also is helps with learning to count money.

My work with second graders has piqued my intereste in skip counting. The projects we’ve been doing, which is making designs with “coins” that add up to $1.00, has been interesting in that I’ve noticed that even though a student can count by fives, you know, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40….,, they have a really hard time doing this same counting by 5’s when you ask them to start at any number other than zero. So, if they have 25 cents plus two nickels they are at a loss as to how to proceed.

Show me what's under the flower. Oh, it a 6, Now can you tell me what's under the heart?
Show me what’s under the flower. Oh, it a 6, Now can you tell me what’s under the heart?

 

Maybe by now you’ve guess what is under the heart in the photo above. Maybe not. If you need more hints, I can reveal that there is an 8 under the star. This will likely finally be enough for you know know that there’s a 10 under the heart.

We’re not just counting by twos here. I’ve made a paper that slides under the windows that helps with counting by 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s.

I consider this to be an elegant design. One piece of folded paper for the holder, with a one piece of paper for four different number series. The little designs on the peek-a-boo doors are cut with paper punches, which I’ve collected over the years. The rhombus shaped window are made by folding the paper and cutting triangles on the fold.

One of my thoughts with this project is that  it can support students in practicing with going both forward and backwards with their skip counting. For instance, if they see two numbers, say 80 and 85, can they tell me the number that is before the 80 and after the 85? This takes some practice, some thinking, and reasoning, but if they can figure out what number is behind the hidden door, I anticipate the pleasure at solving this puzzle will delight them when the peek-a-boo door reveals the answer.

I do plan to share the template for this after I try it out with some real live first graders. To be continued.

Addendum 6/11/2019

Two classes of first graders made this with me. It went really well! To teach them to use it, I do the demonstration on the board, drawing doors that they could “look” behind for clues.

Here’s a video of what playing with this looked like:

Here’s a template so you can make these yourselves: skip counting first grade

Art and Math · Math and Book Arts

Kindergarten Folder for Making Math

Making Symmetry
Making Symmetry

There are some kindergarten teachers I’ve been working with for years. This year I’ve worked with them to create a math-centered book project for their young students. I launched this with a small class earlier this season then repeated it with about 4 groups, total of about 70 kindergarteners, this past week. It went well.

Actually I’m so delighted with how it went that it’s almost embarrassing.

Making the folder
Making the folder

We made a folder out of a long strip of paper, 35″ x  7.5.”

Folder with four compartments
Folder with four compartments

 

I put some score lines in to help these 6 years olds get started but they made most of the folds themselves. I make a big deal about how to fold paper.

The folder is basically a four page accordion, with pockets for a different math activity in each of the pockets.

The first pocket has a paper with peek-a-boo flaps to help kids visualize the composition of groups of numbers. This was an  unusual folded structure, but they caught on really quickly, as you can see in the video clip below.

After the folding comes the cutting

 

Cutting the peek-a-boo flaps
Cutting the peek-a-boo flaps

Then the coloring…

Compositions of the number 4
Compositions of the number 4

…finally they used these images to become more familiar with number compositions. We made these cards for the numbers 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Here’s how it looked watch kids use these to learn their number facts:

Okay, so that was for one pocket.

In another pocket there were squares that the students cut out. I used these to talk about symmetry.

Symmetry with cards
Symmetry with cards

Where one student placed a card on their side of the midline (pencil)  another student mirrored the placement. Seeing symmetry is important in math as students as it is a non-numerical way for them to experience the balance that an equation like 2 +3 = 5 expresses.

 

I extended this symmetry activity beyond the cards in their pockets. We used items around the classroom to create symmetrical designs, something my twitter community liked and retweeted generously.

We also did a project using beads, reminiscent of an abacus, to make groups of 10.

Separating10 beads into groups
Separating 10 beads into groups

The idea here is to give kids another way to interact with ways to make groupings of 10, contributing to their fluency and grasp of combinations of numbers.

Bead counting book
Bead counting cards

 

Finally, we did a fortune-teller, aka chatterbox, which many of us made when we were children.

Fortune Teller, Chatterbox
Fortune Teller, Chatterbox

 

Of course the insides were math themed, using their sight words, too.

Fortune Teller template
Fortune Teller template

Here’s a little clip of the kids playing with these. They absolutely loved this toy.

At first I had a hard time trying to teach this structure to kindergarteners. Once I realized that if I taught it after I worked with them on the symmetry part of this project, the folding would then make more sense to them. It turned out to not be nearly as hard to show them as it originally seemed to be.

The final touch was putting hands on the covers. Literally.

Front and back covers
Front and back covers

Since the kindergarten math curriculum emphasizes using fingers for counting, it seemed highly appropriate to decorate the covers this way.

Whew! What a week!

I was able to meet with each class for a little over an hour three times each.

Looking forward to repeating this project with other groups.

Also, now I want to create something like this for first graders! That’s what I will be working on this week.

 

 

Arts in Education · Math and Book Arts

Books, Symmetry, and Students

Pamphlets made by seventh graders
Sewn Pamphlets made by seventh graders

I’m in the busy part of my art-in-ed, itinerant artist season. The challenge is to keep what I do relevant to the students, to the curriculum, to the teachers, and to myself. Most of the work that I do in schools is done with teachers I’ve worked with in previous years. Usually I repeat a project each year with the teachers’ new classes, though there are always tweaks that are made. Then, sometimes, it’s time to retire a project that’s been working well for years.

I’ve just finished up quite a few projects in classrooms, many of which were new this year. I’m going to attempt to write a number of posts about these projects before the next set of classes that I teach start up.

This is a detail on one of my own drawings
This is a detail on one of my own drawings that starts with the graph of functions.

There’s been a shift in my approach to what I offer to the schools. Whereas I used to think of my work as a way to motivate and celebrate literacy, now I am more focused on using our bookmaking projects in a way that supporting the teachers’ math goals. I’ve been realizing that the math part of the curriculum is where many teachers most appreciate support. There is so much in the paper and book arts that can support the math that students need to learn that making this shift has been thoroughly enjoyable to me.

Symmetry is a theme that kept emerging in the projects that I presented these last few weeks. This is partly to do with the nature of making books, but I also deliberately focussed on it more than it other years. I’ve realized, just recently, that the symmetry of shapes is the visual equivalent of mathematical expressions. I probably won’t express this well, but here goes. Think about doing any sort of math problem that has an equal sign in it. 5+3 = 8. It’s balanced. If you add a 3 to one side you have to add a 3 to the other side to keep the expression true. Math calculations are all about symmetry and balance. It is, therefore, completely appropriate and desirable, to help kids develop their natural affinity to symmetry.

Starting with a pile of cards
Starting with a pile of cards

One of the projects that I did with kindergarten students had to do with these piles of square cards. Students worked in teams. The first student puts down a card, then the partner puts down a card that is a symmetrical reflection of color and shape. They take turns putting down a card and then reflecting it.

Making Symmetry
Making Symmetry

It took a bit of doing for these 6 year olds to get the hang of what we were doing, but, still, quickly, patterns emerged.

Reflection symmetry
Reflection symmetry

These cards, by the way, are an element within a larger math activity book that we made.

 Since these pieces are made from paper, I suggested to the teacher, as this becomes easy for the kids, to cut out one of the smaller squares from some of the cards so that mirroring the shape transformations becomes a bit more challenging.


Another symmetry project I tried out for the first time was with the Pre-K crowd. My friend Joan, who has worked with this age group, showed me this activity that she had developed with kids she had worked with. I’ve been excited to try it out.

Popsicle Stick symmetry
Popsicle Stick symmetry

What I did here was define a line of reflection. Then these five-year olds did the same kind of reflection symmetry that I described above, each taking turns putting down a stick, then the partner reflects it with one of their sticks.

Popsicle Stick symmetry
Popsicle Stick symmetry

Again, it was a struggle to get these students started, but it didn’t take long for them to catch on.

Four student symmetries
Four student symmetries

After a short while I combined groups so, instead of working in pairs, there were four people in a group, which led to different kinds of designs. The pattern above was made near the end of the activity. From start (first handing out the sticks) to finish, this activity took a mere twenty-two minutes, which was how long it took them to began to lose interest. At this point I suggested that they just used the sticks to make whatever arrangements that they wanted to make. Surprisingly, many started trying to use them to spell out their names. I heard their teacher remark something about the fact that they struggle to write their names but they seem to be able to construct them just fine. Which gave me an idea, which I will show in my next post. Now, though I want to jump back to the photo at the top of the post, which is the books made by seventh graders.

Folding and tearing  large paper
Folding and tearing large paper

I’ve been doing this project with the seventh grade for many years. I give them a large piece of paper (23″ x 35″), which they fold and tear to make a pamphlet.

Pamphlets in progress
Pamphlets in progress

I don’t explicitly talk about the symmetry of the folding we do, but I will talk about it in the future. The fact that the sequence of fold and tears results in a scaled down version of the original sheet is something I want them to be aware of.

Glueing out the spine piece of the pamphlet
Glueing out the spine piece of the pamphlet

In fact, every aspect of making this book is symmetrical, even the pattern of the thread that sews the pages together is totally symmetrical.
When building just about anything, even a book, symmetry rules.

Some finished books
Some finished books

These kids are so proud of their books.

Ok, enough for now. More tomorrow…..

math · Math and Book Arts

Fraction & more Fractions

Many Parts of a circle
Many Parts of a circle

I’ve been working with 9 different grade levels, nine different projects, this month, which is kind of wild, and even more wild because of all the snow days and other unexpected shifts in schedules. Most of the projects we’re doing are things I’ve written about enough on these pages, but I have managed to slide in a couple of new things with the fourth graders.

I had some extra time with some of the students  because they chose to stay after school for some extra time with me. Am still racing to finish prep for tomorrow, but want to quickly post about these two extra projects.

Dividing up a circle project
Dividing up a circle project

I brought in circles and sheets of regular shapes. Student cut up the shapes, and rotated them around a center point. The circles were marked with 12 evenly spaces dots around the circumference. We talked about other cyclic things that are divided up into 12 parts (clock, months) and talked about how 12 has so many divisors.

Rotating Shaper around a circle
Rotating Shape around a circle

I printed the shapes on heavy paper. I hadn’t done this with kids before so I didn’t know if they’d have trouble with this. It was no problem for them at all. They were excited, worked creatively, asked questions and were totally engaged.

Student rotations
Student rotations

Here’s the PDFs that I created for this project.

Circles with 12 dots

shapes to rotate in circles

I casually mentioned that ANY shape can be rotated. Well, they didn’t have to hear me say that twice before they were making new shapes.

Crazy Shape rotation
Crazy Shape rotation

The trick is to retain points that can still line up with the center and with a point on the edge of the circle.

Another Crazy Shape Rotation

During class time, I worked with students on a fractions/ bookmaking project that I’ve written about previously on my Books Are Fractions  post.

Fractions book
Fractions book

I knew some students would finish up early, so I showed them some images I had printed up some twitter posts. (If you want to see many more images like this, type in the words Fraction Museum in the twitter search bar and you will be well rewarded)

The kids were enthusiastic about creating fraction museum pieces, which I then photographed.

Fraction Museum hearts
Fraction Museum hearts

The idea is to collect items, see them as part of a whole, then write fractions that describe the collection.

Fraction Museum books
Fraction Museum books

There was some deeper thinking going on than I expected.

Mixed Fraction Museum
Mixed Fraction Museum

I’ve assembled all their images on to 2 large sheets of papers, and will present them to the kids tomorrow….but only if I stop this blogging and get back to work,

 

Addendum March 26 2018

During my fractions conversations with these kids (who, by the way, had a good grasp of fractions before I ever showed up) I talked about the confusion that can happen when trying to understand why, when the denominator is a bigger number, the unit fraction is smaller. I showed them a piece of paper folded into four sections, then said if I had to fold the same paper into eight sections (which we did) that the number of units had to be smaller to accommodate the larger number of sections. Then I asked “Imagine if we had to divide this paper into 100 sections, how small would those sections have to be? 

Hundreths
Hundreths

Well, that was it. They begged to see a page divided into 100 sections. Each time they saw me, they reminded me. Finally, today, I brought in TWO papers, and asked which one of them had fraction units that were each 1/100. Led by an particularly independent thinker, they figured it out. And figured out why, even though the divisions looked different, that they were all 1/100s.  It was a great conversation. Here’ the PDFs of you can ask kids this question yourself: hundreths

So much fun.