Weekend-Bookend #1

July 25, 2015

Three little books which were made from copied, decorated paper which was then cut, nested and sewn. 

These three little books were each made from one copied, decorated paper which was  cut, nested and sewn. I was playing with simplicity here as well as thinking about ways in which whole decorations can be partitioned into pages.

I’m going to try out posting a Weekend-Bookend image each weekend which will be sort of like a snap shot of something from my studio. These posts will be images my handmade books, drawings, details of drawings or some paper engineering that I want to show, accompanied by just a small bit of writing.

Pop Ups with more Pop ups

Pop Ups with more Pop ups

In the summertime, when school is not in session, I’m on my own in terms of deciding on what kinds of projects that I want to teach in workshops. Last week I taught for five days  at the local community center.  My sessions with the kids were 40 minutes long, and although I prepared for 30 rising third and fourth graders, there was no telling how many students would attend each day. I had originally thought I would make a plan for the week, but quickly realized that it was more satisfying to create projects each day based on what I found interesting in the children’s work from the day before.

Making Pop-ups in an Accordion Structure

Making Pop-ups in an Accordion Structure

My own goal for the week was to do explorations with shapes and symmetry.  On Day 1 we made a four-page accordion book and did some cut-&-fold to make pop-ups. The students were amazing paper engineers;  With impressive ease, they created inventive structures.

Pop-up Worksop

Pop-up Worksop

There were plenty of counselors in the room, and from this very first project, these counselors joined right in with creating their own projects.

Overlapping Rotated Squares

Overlapping Rotated Squares

I was so impressed with the students’ folding skills that the next day I helped them create an origami pamphlet that contained more pop-ups, as well as some interesting other cut-outs. What turned out to be the most interesting work on Day 2 was how much the kids liked the little bit of rotational symmetry that I encouraged them to do: I gave them each a square of paper, asked them to trace it on to the cover of their book, then rotate it and trace again.

summer squares 3

These students like the shapes created by shapes, so the next day I brought in a collections of shapes and asked them to arrange tracings of these shapes on a piece of heavy weight paper, which was folded in half.

Tracing Shapes to Create  More Shapes

Tracing Shapes to Create
More Shapes

Students seemed to enjoy creating these images.

summer shapes 2

After they created the outlines they added color.

Colored Shapes

Coloured Shapes

When the coloring was done we folded the paper, and attached some pagesto the fold so that the students had a nice book to take home. The kids seemed to like this project and made some lovely books, but I ended up  feeling like there wasn’t anything particularly interesting going on with this project in terms of explorations of building with shapes. So …

Building Stars and Hexagons with Regular Rhombuses

Building Stars and Hexagons with Regular Rhombuses

…the next day I brought in colored papers that were printed with rhombuses, as well as some white paper printed with a hexagon shape. Each student filled in their own hexagon with 12 rhombuses.

Making a Hexagon with a Star in the Middle

Making a Hexagon with a Star in the Middle

My plan for this project was to have each student make their own individual hexagon then put them all together on a wall so that it would be reminiscent of a quilt.

Paper Hexagon Quilt

Paper Hexagon Quilt

Here’s our paper quilt made from 22 hexagons!

The next day, Day 5, was my last day at this program. I liked the engagement with and results of how the students worked with shapes when they were given structure. There’s a balance that I try to honor of providing structure while allowing individual choices. For my last day, then, I decided to give the students a page that I created that is based on the geometry that uses intersecting circles and lines to create patterns.

A work in progress by one of the couselors

A work in progress by one of the counselors

If you look closely at the photo above you’ll see many different lines and curves overlapping and crisscrossing.

summer geometryI asked students to look for shapes that they liked, to use the lines that they wanted to use, and to ignore the lines that they did not want. It was interesting to watch how the students worked; I was particularly interested in seeing how some children chose to start looking at designs starting in the center, while other children gravitated to the outside edges first.

summer geometry 8

Some students filled areas with color, while others were happy to make colorful outlines of shapes.

summer geometry 2Some drawings were big and bold.

summer geometry 5

Some drawings were delicate and detailed.

summer geometry 4I think that every one of the teenage counselors sat and made their own designs, right alongside of the students. Actually, I think that my favorite unexpected outcome of the week was how involved the teenagers got with the projects.

summer geometry3

This last project of the week was my own personal favorite (though the quilt project runs a really close second). I had never done anything quite like this before with students, and was really surprised to see how much they enjoyed this work, and how differently they each interacted with the lines and curves. This kind of surprise is what’s so great about summertime projects.

Linear Mod Design by Carly

Linear Mod Design by Carly, tenth grade student

Last night 15 people showed up at the library for a couple of hours to make patterns based on lines and circles. I don’t think anyone knew quite what to expect but that didn’t keep them from showing up. A brave bunch. The participants were tweens, teens, and adults. There was at least a 50 year gap between the youngest and oldest: it was quite wonderful to have this group all in one room, as each generation brings their own aesthetic, energy, and reflective questions with them.

by Cordelll,  a ninth grade student

by Cordelll, a ninth grade student

I demonstrated two ways of making designs: using lines (which I wrote about in my previous post) and intersecting circles, which people have been exploring for many centuries. I had originally thought I would show just the circles geometry, but then considered that some people might be really uncomfortable using a compass.  A few people just worked with just the lines, a few people worked with just with circles, and the rest did both.

Michelle's

Michelle’s

Some people were curious about the math that went into the number patterns that I gave them, and I explained it to those who asked.

Lauren's

Lauren’s

At the next workshop I will bring in my laptop and show Dan Anderson’s linear mod open processing page, as well as the tables in desmos.com to people who want to know more.

Siri's, in progress

Siri’s, in progress

There was a great mix of approaches to this way of working.

Jenna's

Jenna’s

I embarrassed myself by not having reviewed the process for making the circle patterns right before the class. I had made many samples of the “seed of life” circles patterns, but then I had done other designs, and when I started demonstrating I got quite confused. I had to go sequester myself for a bit to reconstruct the pattern.

Quinn's designs

Quinn’s designs

One young man didn’t have any interest in coloring anything in. Not only that, but he decided to try out his own pattern of lines. Actually, he tried out everything he could think of, with both the circles and the lines, and ended up with a pile of papers filled with all sorts of designs. It was delightful to see him working out his own templates and number sequences.

Quinn's Crane and Siri's Drawing

Quinn’s Crane and Siri’s Drawing

By the end of the workshop this young man had started doing some origami, which he graciously gifted to me. I photographed (above) his crane with the work of an adult, because I so enjoyed seeing having all these young people and adults in one room, all together making art.

Here are some links for anyone who is interested:

The PDF to use with the line designs

Dan Anderson’s Open Processing Linear Mod page to see what’s going on with the line designs

Dearing Wang’s Circle Drawings

Circle Geometry by Paula Beardell Krieg

Next Tuesday I will do doing another one of these workshops! I’m looking forward to it.

Line Designs

June 30, 2015

6x + 5

It’s handy to have a few methods for creating designs at one’s fingertips. Three Tuesday evenings during the month of July at my local library I’ll have a chance to work with people on producing images that are part recipe, part personal. I’m describing the workshops as being focused on making patterned images based on curves and lines. Go ahead and click on the link in the first sentence here if you want too see some of the curves that we’ll be looking at. This post is about the lines

Starting with w parallel # lines

Starting with w parallel # lines Click HERE for PDF of this page

I’ve been working on this system of connecting dots. People will get this nearly blank paper and will choose a pattern of numbers to write across the top. In the image below the pattern 5,3,1,9,7 repeats 4 times along the top, then the numbers are connected with a straight edge to the corresponding numbers on the bottom. What results is a pattern of intersecting lines that can be colored in an infinite number of ways. Here’s just one of those ways (oops, note that the paper, and thus the numbers, has been turned upside down as I like the image better this way):

linear-mod-4

The drawing above shows all the criss-crossing lines, but if I zoom in on just one area the resulting image has a different sort of look.  In other words, something that looks like this (whose repeat pattern was  5,7,9,1,3) :

linear mod 6

….can be cropped to something like this:

Starting with two parallel line

Starting with two parallel line

My thought is that it’s possible to make many cropped images from the same “master” image, and thus end up with numerous designs that can stand alone, but that still go together.

I’ve been trying out different mediums to color these in with. Pencil, colored pencil, and markers all seem fine. I’m not having much luck with crayons or watercolors, but that may just be me. Here’s one that’s all pencil (the repeat pattern here is 5,3,1,9,7 : these numbers are visible at the bottom of the drawing, which I’ve turned upside down)

Pencil drawing

Pencil drawing

The image below is done entirely with markers. It differs from the others in that the spacing of the lines is twice as wide all the others here, and the pattern of numbers written across the top only repeats twice (3,1,5,1,7)

linear-mod-2

I’ve made so many of these, but they are all so different that I don’t feel like I’ve made enough. I’m interested to see what the participants in these upcoming classes do with this way of working.

number pattern 3,6,9,2,5,8,1,4,7,0

number pattern 3,6,9,2,5,8,1,4,7,0 turned upside down. To me. this image looks like two butterflies or hummingbirds on opposite sides of a flower.

I hope to be posting photos of images made by workshop participants during the course of July.

My plan, by the way, is to basically hand out the number patterns that I’ve come up with, so it really will be a connect the dots kind of activity, at least until the coloring begins. If anyone is interested in where these numbers come from and likes reading about linear equations, I put a post up on Google Plus to explain all.

Wish me luck in running a fun workshop!

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