Belin 50th Brochure PRINT-1

At the Comm, Waverly, PA

Right now I’m preparing materials for three short workshops that will be happening at the Community Center in Waverly, Pennsylvania. this Saturday, October 11. There will be many presenters during the grand weekend long celebration of the 50th year of the E. Lammot Belin Arts Scholarship. I’ve taken a look at the line-up, which was published as part of an article, in the local Times-Tribune, and it looks like I will be missing many great workshops while I am teaching my own.

If you happen to be in the Scranton area, do come. These workshops are all free to the participants.

I’ll be busy with three different groups. For adults, at 1:15 I will be teaching the Card Carrying Blizzard Book, a diminutive structure which can be modified in many ways, and which is created through a sequence of cleverly arranged folds.

Card Carrying Blizzard Book, a book structure designed by Hedi Kyle

Card Carrying Blizzard Book, a book structure designed by Hedi Kyle

The organizers of this event pretty much left it up to me what to teach, and they let me decide on what ages I wanted to work with. Well, I like just about every age group, so I asked to do three workshops, each focusing on a different group. I’m looking forward to showing adults how to make this little card-carrying book, as it’s not something that I often have an opportunity to teach.

At noon,just before the adult workshop, I’ll be working with 8 to 12 years, making pop-ups.

Many Layered Pop-up

Many Layered Pop-up

I plan to show some basic pop-up concepts to these children, then give them time to let loose with their own creativity.

The morning workshop, the first of the three, is one of my favorites to teach.I nearly never have the right venue in which to present it. Here’s the description that I wrote up:

11:00 – 11:50 Impromptu Paper and Book Arts for Parents and their Pre-school Children

 Here’s a workshop that stretches how creative Moms and Dads can be while tending young children. During this open studio time caretakers, who are invited to bring their infants and toddlers along with them, will learn how to transform regular pieces of paper into whimsical and wondrous playthings.

Simple Paper Structures

So, did you get that? Infants and toddlers are invited to come to this workshop, along with their caretakers. There’s no guarantee about what will get done, as each child/adult pair have their own unpredictable dynamics.  I will be bringing written directions for the projects so that people can work at their own paces. I think I will have some helpers with me, too.

Small Paper Stage

Small Paper Stage

I dreamt up the concept for this workshop in waiting rooms when my children were small. I would scrounge up a piece of paper, sometimes an expired flyer hanging on the wall, sometimes one of those cards that all always falling out of magazines, and I would entertain my children with a little pop-up or an impromptu book. It really came in handy, knowing how to transform bits of paper into playthings. This workshop lets me share these little treasures.

At various times I’ve already posted directions for the simple little structures that I will be teaching in the toddlers’ class. But, if you are interested,  I’ve  put together a 6 page, 4MB PDF file that I can send via email to anyone who asks for it.  It won’t go out automatically so be patient, though chances are you will get it within about half a day. You’ll wait longer, though, if you ask on Saturday: or. if you are impatient, you will just have to come to Waverly, Pennsylvania and sit in on one of the workshops.. See you there!

Jumping Jumping Jack

Jumping Jack assembled out of Small Cut Shapes, glued together

Welkom!  A few week ago I noticed I was getting some verkeer vanuit Nederland – traffic from the Netherlands. While it’s not unusual for a far off web site to link to my blog, what has caught my attention, and what has prompted this post, is that, day after day, for several weeks now, I continue to get visitors coming to my site through a post by . Elenea wrote what looks to be the most comprehensive post on the web about Antique Jumping Jacks, trekpoppen or, in the singular, trekpop. ( What a great word!)

Jumping Jack, Trekpop, "built" from shapes of paper

Elenea’s post has it all: there’s a short video showing the dynamic qualities of the structure, and there’s an impressively researched and nicely diverse list of links to sites that include patterns for making Jumping Jacks and coloring pages for this structure. Although Elenea’s post is written in Dutch (I think….hmmm..) the links that she posts are mostly written in a language that I understand.

Cut out shapes to use to make the Jumping Jack

If you saw my first post on Antique Jumping Jacks and my post on Jumping Jacks made by students in 2010 you ‘ve seen that I haven’t been using patterns for making Jumping Jacks.  I encourage students to cut out interesting shapes from paper, then assemble them together to make their own unique works of art.

Jumping Jack in shades of blue

 These photos were take a few weeks ago, when I taught, for the second year in a row, a morning, vacation week workshop at the Southern Vermont Arts Center.

  I was delighted by how different the Jumping Jacks were from each other.

“Backstage” of a Jumping Jack

Here’s the back side of my Jumping Jack. Although I use heavy paper, I’ve decided that it’s wise to use support the neck with a flat wooden spoon. Also, I taped a paper loop to the head, to attach the string to hold Jack from the top. Oddly, I couldn’t convince any of the students in my workshop to extend a string from the head. They preferred to hold the puppet’s head.

 
Now, here’s another odd thing: this Dutch post that is referring me all these visitors was written in 2007, four years before my post was written.  Which means, I guess, that someone else has written a post that has compelled people to go to Elenea’s site, and then people come to my site?! Wait, no, that can’t be it…she must’ve recently updated it? …who knows!
 
Related links: Elenea’s post (in Dutch)
and
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