Geometric Drawings · origami · Zhen Xian Bao

Late for Black Friday: A New Kit

Over the summer I made a 3-hidden boxes packet of these folded paper Zhen Xian Bao with an oceany paper for a workshop in NYC. I put up for sale, then sold out of, the packets that I didn’t use.

In the fall I made more papers for another workshop, but used autumn colors with a design that reminded me of falling leaves. Those are all gone.

Now, here we are, barrelling into winter, so I designed papers that remind me of snowflakes. Just put kits up for these on sale at Etsy, at https://www.etsy.com/listing/744194390/packet-to-make-a-three-section-chinese

I must be delusional. It thought that it would take me only a couple of days to put this project together, thinking they’d be ready for Black Friday. I should know better by now. It has never taken me less than three intense days to design a new paper. Why did I think this would be any faster this time? In fact, it took longer. I couldn’t get the colors to work right, and I struggled with lots about the design.

But I stayed with it, and in the end, FINALLY, today, not two days ago, it finished coming together.

There’s so much about these papers with this structure that I love. It’s full of shapes and colors and patterning that work together in unusual and surprising ways. Really had to work at letting the patterning reveal itself while still keeping it within the boundaries of my own vision.

There’s a bit of a story here.

I had been looking through Clarissa Grande’s twitter post, searching for inspiration. It was the second design in this thread, the one in that is green and gold, that caught my eye.

 

I didn’t realize it at the time, but it is a design I had studied and created quite some time ago while learning from Samira Mian. Samira pointed out that this was one that she had taught as the Chinese Qur’anic Manuscript Arcing Motif.

Now this shows what I like the most about these geometric constructions: the same underlying structure can create such wildly different results. Going more in the direction of Clarissa’s work, I came up with this pattern:

This led me to the final patterns in the top of the post.

What a journey!

I will have these papers in a kit for sale for just a couple of weeks at https://www.etsy.com/listing/744194390/packet-to-make-a-three-section-chinese

 

 

 

Book Art · geometry and paperfolding · origami · Zhen Xian Bao

Threads

Threads, a Zhen Xian Bao, Paula B Krieg
Threads, a Zhen Xian Bao, Paula B Krieg

I just sent this piece out to be in a show in Massachusetts. Included with the piece is an invitation for the book to be handled and for the viewers to take a piece of it with them.  As you might suspect, there’s a bit of a condition.

I’ve been making models of this folder of expandable boxes, known as Zhen Xian Bao, for quite some time. I’ve been so busy deciphering the structure and creating designs for the papers that I make them out of that I haven’t thought too much about what to put into these boxes, which. traditionally, were used to store thread.

Here’s the chronology of thought then. First structure, then embellishment, now content. Finally I’m ready to think about content, now that I am satisfied with some of the solutions to my first and second considerations.

Here’s what I’ve put in the boxes:

There’s about 64 paper tiles stored in the various boxes of this structure. Each tile is threaded with a loop. The back of each tile has words or phrases that I repeat to myself, the threads of thought that help me get through my days.

I had wondered if I would be able to come up with 64 things that I tell myself, so I asked my a couple of friends for some of their thought threads. I included some from Jocelyn, especially liked “Bring a book,” and Susan’s “Mend a thing.”

Funny thing, though, after I got started, it was easy to come up with scores of things I tell myself.  So many thoughts woven into a day.

Now, here’s a box of blank tiles that I’ve sent along with my work. There’s three of these boxes. They are meant to sit alongside my Zhen Xian Bao. There is also a pencil in each box. I’ve sent word that I am inviting viewers to add one of their thoughts to one of my boxes. Then, after they’ve made their contribution, they are invited to take one of my thoughts with them.

 

I don’t know how this will work out. As there are tiles in each one of these 13 expandable boxes, I am hoping/anticipating that my Threads book will return with wear and tear showing. I will consider evidence of handling as the finishing touches.

 

Now it’s out of in the world, out of my hands!

Geometric Drawings · geometry and paper · geometry and paperfolding · origami

Pentagons, Paper Folding, Stars & Origami

I came across a lovely way of folding stars. It was in a youtube video by someone named Tobias.

As lovely as these stars are, what really caught my attention was the way Tobias showed how to use paper folding to make a pentagon from a square. This square-to-pentagon transformation was in a separate video, and since it will take me about two days to forget everything I saw in the video I drew out the directions.

How to fold a Pentagon from a Square
How to fold a Pentagon from a Square. For the Video of this that Tobias made, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kJmJUQVbO0

 

After the novelty (but not the thrill) wore off of making a pentagon from a square I began to look at the angles that I was making and figured that I could make the star with less steps (and perhaps with more accuracy) if I just started out with the net of the shape, so I made this map of the paper star’s fold lines:

Lines for a Folded Paper Star
Lines for a Folded Paper Star

If you make Tobias’s stars, after you get the hang of which lines fold in which direction, I highly recommend printing out lines above, score the lines with an inkless ink pen, and make that same star using just its essential folds.

The back of the paper sta
The back of the paper star

The photo above shows the backside of these stars. Quite a nice backside!

I’m sure that there are all sorts of things to do with pentagons, but something I want to mention is something that is fast and impressive, sort of the pentagon version of snowflake cuts. If you cut off an angled slice at the bottom of the folded up pentagon (step 12 in my tutorial drawing) there are all sorts of star possibilities.

36-54-90 triangles, with cutting lines on their tips
36-54-90 triangles, with cutting lines on their tips

These little beauties turn into:

Stars in Pentagons
Stars in Pentagons

The stars inscribed into these pentagons were made by cutting through all layers on the tips of the folded shapes.

 

And look, below there’s something extra for my friends who teach Geometry, and who might like a holiday themed angle activity. Part of the working out the folding pattern for the star was deciphering certain angles.

Find the Angles with degrees of 90, 45, and ~72, 18, 36, 54, and 108
Find the Angles with degrees of 90, 45, and ~72, 18, 23, 36, 54, 63 and 108

I had a good bit of help with the especially tricky parts of understanding the angle relationships. I’m sharing two twitter threads here, just because it was such a pleasure to get help from my friends.

and

That’s about it for now. Oh, and if you need to directions on how to fold a square from a rectangle, take a look at https://bookzoompa.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/paper-folding-squares-and-equilateral-triangles/


addendum March 2018

Here’s someone making this star. She makes it looks so easy! https://www.instagram.com/p/BfuSgYdnmY5/

Book Art · Box · origami

Terra Cotta and Green

Variations on Chinese Thread Book
two more Variations on Chinese Thread Book

My thought was that I would make a model based on the Chinese Thread Book, then make variations of said model using different papers. Turns out that using different papers resulted in creating many more questions than I anticipated. My next few posts will be showing how these questions got answered, one Zhen Xian Bao at a time.

Zhen Xian Bzo variation in Terra Cotta and Green
Zhen Xian Bao variation in Terra Cotta and Green

Whereas my previous thread-book-variation has a romantic feel to in, this one feels earthy to me, like it’s meant for keeping track of seeds, gardens, and planting/harvesting info. The green print is Chiyogami paper from The Paper Place, and the solid green on the left is Neeneh Classic Linen Cover, Augusta Green.

Variation of Chinese Thread Book in Green and Terra Cotta, Paula Beardell Krieg
Variation of Chinese Thread Book in Green and Terra Cotta

The pamphlet on the left is constructed with a five-station pamphlet stitch using waxed linen thread. The book block is Mohawk Superfine. The second tier box on the right is machine-made paper infused with flower petals.

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Both the pamphlet and the rectangular trays fold away to reveal a big rectangular tray as the bottom layer, made with handmade paper from India. You can also see in this photo a sleeve made from Metallic Stardream paper. underneath the second tier try.

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Inside the pamphlet is a small envelope that expands into….

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…a little box.

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Unlike my Indigo, Gold and Red version, I didn’t use the Chiyogami paper for the outside wrapper. I tried out lots of options, but this handmade terra cotta paper purchased long ago from Dieu Donne Papermill was the best choice. I still have just a bit of this paper left, so I can continue using this for a few more wraps, but just a few. It’s hard for me to use up a paper that I may never see again, but I remind myself that I have it so that I can use it.

It takes awhile to assemble these thread books, but what has taken me the longest is to mix and match my papers until I am happy –and I demand to be really happy– with my paper choices. I try to let the papers I start with suggest the rest of the paper choices.  Since this part takes so long, I am trying to make at least two of each paper/color combination, in an attempt to do at least a bit of streamlining.

One surprising discovering is realizing how well Stardream Metallics match the Chirogami. I’ll be showing more of this match in the next post, which, by the way, will feature a thread book that has a suede wrapper.  I didn’t see that coming, but it’s what worked. I feel like I’m just the messenger…