math · Math and Book Arts

Fraction & more Fractions

Many Parts of a circle
Many Parts of a circle

I’ve been working with 9 different grade levels, nine different projects, this month, which is kind of wild, and even more wild because of all the snow days and other unexpected shifts in schedules. Most of the projects we’re doing are things I’ve written about enough on these pages, but I have managed to slide in a couple of new things with the fourth graders.

I had some extra time with some of the students some because they chose to stay after school for some extra time with me. Am still racing to finish prep for tomorrow, but want to quickly post about these two extra projects.

Dividing up a circle project
Dividing up a circle project

I brought in circles and sheets of regular shapes. Student cut up the shapes, and rotated them around a center point. The circles were marked with 12 evenly spaces dots around the circumference. We talked about other cyclic things that are divided up into 12 parts (clock, months) and talked about how 12 has so many divisors.

Rotating Shaper around a circle
Rotating Shape around a circle

I printed the shapes on heavy paper. I hadn’t done this with kids before so I didn’t know if they’d have trouble with this. It was no problem for them at all. They were excited, worked creatively, asked questions and were totally engaged.

Student rotations
Student rotations

Here’s the PDFs that I created for this project.

Circles with 12 dots

shapes to rotate in circles

I casually mentioned that ANY shape can be rotated. Well, they didn’t have to hear me say that twice before they were making new shapes.

Crazy Shape rotation
Crazy Shape rotation

The trick is to retain points that can still line up with the center and with a point on the edge of the circle.

Another Crazy Shape Rotation

During class time, I worked with students on a fractions/ bookmaking project that I’ve written about previously on my Books Are Fractions  post.

Fractions book
Fractions book

I knew some students would finish up early, so I showed them some images I had printed up some twitter posts. (If you want to see many more images like this, type in the words Fraction Museum in the twitter search bar and you will be well rewarded)

The kids were enthusiastic about creating fraction museum pieces, which I then photographed.

Fraction Museum hearts
Fraction Museum hearts

The idea is to collect items, see them as part of a whole, then write fractions that describe the collection.

Fraction Museum books
Fraction Museum books

There was some deeper thinking going on than I expected.

Mixed Fraction Museum
Mixed Fraction Museum

I’ve assembled all their images on to 2 large sheets of papers, and will present them to the kids tomorrow….but only if I stop this blogging and get back to work,

 

Addendum March 26 2018

During my fractions conversations with these kids (who, by the way, had a good grasp of fractions before I ever showed up) I talked about the confusion that can happen when trying to understand why, when the denominator is a bigger number, the unit fraction is smaller. I showed them a piece of paper folded into four sections, then said if I had to fold the same paper into eight sections (which we did) that the number of units had to be smaller to accommodate the larger number of sections. Then I asked “Imagine if we had to divide this paper into 100 sections, how small would those sections have to be? 

Hundreths
Hundreths

Well, that was it. They begged to see a page divided into 100 sections. Each time they saw me, they reminded me. Finally, today, I brought in TWO papers, and asked which one of them had fraction units that were each 1/100. Led by an particularly independent thinker, they figured it out. And figured out why, even though the divisions looked different, that they were all 1/100s.  It was a great conversation. Here’ the PDFs of you can ask kids this question yourself: hundreths

So much fun.

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