Spiraling Pages

October 16, 2017

Spiral

Spiral

I’ve been playing around with spiraling paper, so when my teacher friend Lana asked me to recommend some books for her class to make, and mentioned something about a student wanting to do something with a spiral, this structure came to mind.

Spiraling pages made from copy paper, an old calendar, outdated map, and a pretty orange scrap

Spiraling pages made from copy paper, an old calendar, outdated map, and a pretty orange scrap

There’s many ways to go about making this, but, since I’m thinking about classroom-bookmaking, I featured regular copy paper in the video tutorial for this structure. Here’s the video:

It’s actually a really simple folding pattern.  I fold the paper into 8 equal parts, all valley folds, then divide each folded section in half with a diagonal mountain fold. Here’s what the folds look like when two sheets of 8.5″ x 11″ pages are linked together (becoming 8.5″ x 22″)

The Folds before the Spiraling

The Folds before the Spiraling

The paper above is actually two pieces of copy paper joined together.

Spiraling Snake or Snaking Spiral?

Spiraling Snake or Snaking Spiral?

There are lots of ways to set up this structure.

Writing and Decoration on Spiraling pages

Writing and Decoration on Spiraling pages

The writing can be hidden within the spiral, revealed only when the twist is undone, or it can show on the parts that aren’t hidden.

Side view of a Spiral Book

Side view of a Spiral Book

It can also be cajoled into taking on this form with a skinny middle. You’ll have to watch the video (or experiment) to see how to tease out this shape.

Spiral Book

Spiral Book

These take only a few minutes to make. The main points to keep in mind are to make accurate folds, make sharp, well creased folds, and make sure all the vertical folds are valley folds and the diagonals are mountain folds. Be patient when folding the paper into a spiral the first time. After the first time it will close easily if you twist the book in the correct direction as you compress the spiral; you’ll be able to tell if you are not twisting in the right direction by its failure to close.

For the rest of the handmade books that recommended to Lana, see my the post Four Books Students Can Figure Out How to Make on Their Own. This post Four Simple Pamphlet Bindings is a good one, too, but it doesn’t have many pictures.

I hope Lana sends me photos if her students make any of these structures!

2 Responses to “Spiraling Pages”

  1. barleybooks Says:

    Thank you Paula. I spent yesterday evening making some of these – so simple and so lovely!

    Like


  2. […] by Paula Beardell Krieg, I’ve spent the last two evenings folding spirals. First I followed her […]

    Like


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