Hexagon-Flexagon meets the Double Arm Trig

November 22, 2015

double-arm-trig-yellow

Although I intend the title of this post to refer to what I’ve been messing around with this weekend, I’m not really sure it means anything. What’s been happening in my studio is that I’ve wanted to mix up some interesting lines with some interesting folds.

After a person with the handle of GHS Maths posted a group of images made by rotating the graph of a trig equation I got it into my head to see what one of them would look like on a hexagon-flexagon.

If you don’t know what a hexagon-flexagon is, you haven’t watched enough Vy Hart videos. In 2012 Vy offered her own utterly delightful interpretations of what she thought people should know about this piece of paper wizardry in Hexaflexagon, (6 MILLION views!), Hexaflexagon 2, and the sequel Hexaflexagon Safety Guide .

 A Hexagon-Flexagon has three distinct sides, which results in six distinct designs: I’ve written about these here, here, and showcased student work here. I haven’t thought about these in a while, but it seemed to me that the image at the top of this post, and others that I had been working with lately, might be interesting to put on a hexaflexagon. 

double-arm-trig-bw

I had  ideas for all sorts of images but I became so enchanted by what the variations of the image above that in the end this is what I went with.

Three-hex

My computer did not like this idea at all. I spent half my weekend redoing what I lost when my program crashed, half my weekend watching that blue swirly thing going around, and half my weekend coddling my computer so it wouldn’t crash. I know that I’ve listed three halves, so if that bothers you, here’s what I did with  fourth half: I was able to actually make an image that became a hexaflexagon.

This is what a hexagon-flexagon looks like on two sides of copy paper. I always want things to fit onto standard copy paper, so I had made this template: hexagonflexagontemplatecolor

 

It’s a bit tricky to follow, but it actually works really well. I love being able to print these up on my little printer.

This is a dynamic structure, that is not easily appreciated in still photos. I am going to either get my son to make a video of me working the structure or will post the more appropriate stills that I can come up with. Tomorrow. Edited into this post. See you then.

Update: I made a quick video! My first one! Based on the image in this PDF which is printed on both sides of the paper.

UPdate #2

For a hexaflexagon template that has a snowflake, a Christmas wreath and a Star of David, visit Chalkdust magazine at http://chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/how-to-make-christmas-special/. You’ll find a link there, and now here too, for Martin Gardner’s famous article on Hexaflexagons.

2 Responses to “Hexagon-Flexagon meets the Double Arm Trig”

  1. goldenoj Says:

    Perfect timing! We’re doing flexagons next week in honor of Martin Gardner. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person


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