Giving In to Giving Up

June 11, 2015

Can't figure out why it's not snapping together for me

Can’t figure out why it’s not snapping together for me

After exploring the language of symmetry, which I wrote about in my previous post, I started trying to figure out a straightforward way to teach this symmetry to the children that I will be meeting with next month. I’ve spent many hours over many days, creating all sorts of pattern templates, page templates, drawings, designs and cut-outs with the goal of presenting something clear, inspiring and doable. It’s not working out. It’s time to give up. I have a big envelope that everything is going into.

Making an accordion for Vertical Strip Symmetry

Making an accordion for Vertical Strip Symmetry

I’m surprised. It seemed to be going well. I figured out, for instance, that the best way to make a strip with vertical symmetry was to make an accordion, which easy to fold, especially if I make copies using the patterned paper shown above.

symmetry 4

Accordion folded paper with designs cut out

Still, after days of working out systems and designs, I didn’t have that feeling that I get when I know I’ve gotten it right.

Vertical Strip Symmetry from an accordion folded strip

Vertical Strip Symmetry from an accordion folded strip

It’s a disappointment, to say that least, to acknowledge that I need to just stop and put this all aside. I’ve been at the place before: It doesn’t scare me anymore, it’s just that I was so excited about how things seemed to be working out. I’m perplexed that I’m not ending up where I wanted to be.

Glide Reflection

Glide Reflection

Now, hours later, I’m sorting out what’s missing.

symmetry 7

 

What I’m missing is the input of the students. The way that I really learn to teach something is to actually teach it. I watch how students react to what I’m explaining, I watch the work that they do,  listen to the questions they ask, learn where my teaching is lacking through the “mistakes” that they make. I’m in this isolated vacuum now. To make this lesson vibrant, to make it snap, I need the students. So, that’s it. Everything is in the envelope. To be continued, after adding students….

 

 

8 Responses to “Giving In to Giving Up”

  1. Stephanie Says:

    I love your posts, Paula! I love the way you think. You’re inspiring.

    Like

  2. irisdeleeuwi Says:

    wow Paula, this is great. You are a genius!

    Like

  3. dariawilber Says:

    Paula,

    Don’t give up. Check out Friedrich Foebel. Most of his paper art was based on symmetry. Hope this helps. (Check out the book *Extreme Origami*, Kunihiko Kashahara. It has some Froebel forms you might be interested in. Here’s a link to Amazon, I picked up my copy 2nd hand: Extreme Origami, Kunihiko-Kasahara ).

    Happy weekend,

    daria

    On Thu, Jun 11, 2015 at 9:11 PM, Playful Bookbinding and Paper Works wrote:

    > Paula Beardell Krieg posted: ” After exploring the language of > symmetry, which I wrote about in my previous post, I started trying to > figure out a straightforward way to teach this symmetry to the children > that I will be meeting with next month. I’ve spent many hours over many > days”

    Liked by 1 person

  4. ivasallay Says:

    I’m certain once students are added your presentation will become fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Siri Says:

    Fascinating. Look forward to the next chapter here.

    Liked by 1 person


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