Hexagon via Paper Folding

April 9, 2014

Regular Hexagon

Regular Hexagon

One of my all-time favorite paper moments was when I learned how to fold a regular hexagon. Many times, with  protractor or compass in hand,  I had tried to draw hexagons, but  they never worked out just right. This post, which features a tutorial page, is something that I have been wanting to do for a long time, but I needed to stumble upon just the right random instant of blog time. Recently, while musing about life, the universe and everything, well it seemed like the right time to finally put these drawings and steps down on paper. After all, the six goes neatly into 42.

Paper Folding and the Regular Hexagon by Paula Krieg

Paper Folding and the Regular Hexagon

 

Now, if you go ahead and make a hexagon for yourself, which of course you will because who could possibly resist trying this, you might notice a few splendid things. Then again, you might not notice them, so I will point them out.  First, you will notice that a preliminary step towards hexagonism is that you create an equilateral triangle , which is just the first of the many perks of this activity. The second, most extraordinary flash will be when you realize that the intersection of the three folded lines within your triangle is actually the center of the triangle. The reason that this is so remarkable is that this intersection point in no way looks like it’s at the center of the triangle. It just looks wrong as a center, and you might not believe it. But when you bring the tips of the triangle in to meet the intersection, well, let’s just say you will believe. 

Silently folding a hexagon drawn by Paula Krieg

Silently folding a hexagon

Just for fun, I decided to include this set of directions, too, because, really, it’s a much more attractive page than the one with all the writing on it. And there are plenty of people who will try it out without reading a thing, so here you have it.

Now after you’ve noticed that you’ve made a big equilateral triangle, there are few more shapes to uncover.  First of all, there are all sorts of little equilateral triangles inside of the hexagon. And if you fold the hexagon in half, well, you will have made an isosceles trapezoid. Now, think back, when is the last time you actually held an isosceles trapezoid in your hands? Next, fold back a third of the trapezoid, and there you have a rhombus. And if you can’t remember what any of these shapes are it’s probably because you never learned to spell them. Really, what it is it with this terminology? Wouldn’t these all these shapes be more memorable if we called them lollipops or kiwis?

A special nod here to Christopher Danielson. math teacherblogger who recently had way too much fun using hexagons in his classroom, so I wanted to add something to the virtual hexagon mix. And I want to acknowledge Steve Morris,  who kept me thinking way too long about the edges and shape of the universe: I no long think that the universe is shaped like a hexagon. That was just silly. Now I think it’s the shape that’s made when hexagons and pentagons are fitted together, -but don’t be looking for a post about that. I think I need to get back to making books. Rectangular books.

2 Responses to “Hexagon via Paper Folding”


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